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Technical Camera Overview
www.hasselblad.com
Technical Camera Overview for Hasselblad sales staff and retail partners

1
Contents
TECHNICAL CAMERA OVERVIEW
Why use a technical camera...................................................................................................... 3
Movements explained...........................................................................................................................3
Hasselblad HTS 1.5...................................................................................................................6
Technical Camera Suppliers .............................................................................................................7
Mounting Accessories............................................................................................................... 9
Shutter Connectivity.................................................................................................................10
Powering your digital back...................................................................................................................15
H6D Digital capture unit view camera settings....................................................................................18

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Why use a Technical Camera
The main reason photographers use large format or technical cameras is to access the wide range of camera movements that are
then available to them. The most common of these are explained in the following pages. The examples shown are created using a
Hasselblad HTS 1.5 Tilt / Shift adapter but the principle and movements apply to view/technical cameras as well. These movements
are possible due to the large image circles created by the lenses used, inconjunction with the abillity to move the front plate holding
the exposure unit (lens with combined shutter), or the rear plate with the capture unit ( or film back) attached. Normally these two
plates are joined via a bellows type arrangement. Modern designs of technical / view cameras may limit the movemtnts to just the
front plate and have a smaller bellows unit to keep the camera as compact as is possible to aid field use.
Movements
“Shift” is the moving of a lens, up and down or to the sides, from its central position while retaining its perpendicular orientation
to the film plane. Simply put, the larger diameter of the projected image circle at the film plane allows for much greater freedom in
“placing” the required image area within the now much broader circle before vignetting takes effect. And most importantly, all this
happens without moving the orientation of the camera in relation to the subject. So if verticals, for example, are acceptable in the
viewfinder, they will remain so whatever the amount of shift to include the “hidden” parts of the image. Simple but ingenious.
Image shows projected image circle( black circle) and the area coverering the camera sensor (Red Rectangle). “Shifting” the lens
allows the sensor box to be moved around the projected image circle.
“Tilt” differs from shift in that the normal perpendicular orientation of the lens to the film plane is changed resulting in a change in
the plane of focus. This means that at any given aperture/focus setting, the depth of field in the subject will not remain as simply
the space between two measured points from the camera as is normally the case, but increased or decreased. This amount is user
controlled. Once again, simple but ingenious. By combining these two laws of physics, the doors of creative solutions are thrown
wide open. The list of situations that could advantageously exploit tilt and shift is probably longer than it might
first appear to be. For some professional photographers it could rapidly become an essential item for all work. But the story doesn’t
end there. Large-format users have been using tilt and shift for many years, partly because they could, but partly because they had
to. Some photographic solutions unfortunately, have also created problems, lens edge performance, for example, being one of them.
The dilemma that arose forced photographers to find a compromise, between the “illness” and the “cure”.

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USE OF SHIFT
For perfect parallel vertical lines in an
image the camera needs to be parallel
with the subject. Tilting the whole camera
would produce converging parallel lines.
By shifting the lens parallel to the image
plane, you can raise or lower the view without tilting the camera. If the subject is a
building as in this example, the camera
should be placed level.
The example shown here demonstrayes
the shift movement using the HTS 1.5 Tilt
/ Shift adapter.
Camera positioned level with the ground. The top of the building is
outside the area projected on to the sensor (HCD 28mm + HTS).
Camera titlted to include the top of the building resulting in converging
verticals in the image.
Camera positioned level with the ground again, the lens shifted “up”
9mm to bring the top of the building into the image with converging
verticals.

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USE OF TILT
By tilting the lens in relation to the image plane, you can effectively
tilt the plane of sharpness in the subject. Depending on your idea
of the final image you can either use tilt to enlarge the apparent
depth of field or reduce it.
The full image
HCD28 + HTS 1.5 at f/11
No lens tilt produces some lack of sharpness in the foreground and background due to insufficient depth
of field.
Lens tilted a few degrees to the right produces an image with perfect sharpness from the foreground to
the background.
Lens tilted a few degrees to the left produces an image with an apparent shallow depth of field.
www.hasselblad.com

6
HTS 1.5 TILT/SHIFT ADAPTER SOLUTION
Digital photography has made it easier to use the tilt/shift features of technical cameras in order to achieve a particular photographic
expression. Hasselblad solutions can play a large part in this area as all current professional digital solutions from Hasselblad are well
adapted for technical camera operation to exploit the best from both worlds.
However, technical cameras can be awkward to work with in the field, and the controls to determine the desired focus are not optimal.
So in addition to the use of Hasselblad sensor units, ground-breaking developments now allow for tilt/shift work using the HTS 1.5 tilt/
shift adapter directly on an H system camera that offers a very user-friendly way to produce very high image quality results.
The light and portable HTS 1.5 tilt/shift adapter for H system cameras enlarges the image circle to allow a +/- 18mm shift (half image
height) and +/-10 degrees of tilt.
The adapter is compatible with six lenses: HCD 24mm, HCD 28mm, HC 35mm, HC 50mm, HC 80mm and HC 100mm and has a magnification factor that increases the focal length of each lens by 1.5 times.
With the introduction of Digital Lens Corrections where images processed in Phocus are automatically corrected regardless of HTS
adapter setting, significant improvements strike the viewer immediately. All calculations and adjustments take place in the background monitored and governed by sensors in the adapter. The sharpness at the edge of the frame, despite the fact that the lens is
pushed to its limits, remains stunning.
On the creative front, it has long been standard practice for photographers to break the rules in order to produce images that show
something just a little different. Large-format users were well-acquainted with the imaginative possibilities that arose from making
the “wrong” camera or lens movements. And now Hasselblad users can enjoy this stimulating freedom as well. Fascinating and
captivating
images are easily conjured up and controlled withjust a few slight movements. The combination of large sensors and razor sharp