Uploader: Jack
Country: Turkey
Uploaded: Jan 17, 2019
Price: Free
Rating: Based on 1 user ratings

Please, verify you are not robot to load rest of pages

download digipan manual pdf

Using Digipan
A presentation on using Digipan software to pass 
messages and hold QSOs with other operators.
Part of a continuing program of training presented by 
Hernando County Amateur Radio Emergency Services.
next slide
1
Using Digipan
  With so many programs that operate Phase Shift Keying (PSK), one might ask why 
use Digipan?
  One obvious reason is that it has been around for quite a while and is a very stable 
program which is important when you want software that you must depend on.
  The next benefit to Digipan is that this program will work on new PCs and older 
equipment with limited memory and it is well suited for sending text under less than 
desirable conditions. The program (version 2.0) can display more than one 
conversation at a time which can be very useful when there is a need to monitor a 
number of incoming signals.
  It is known to work on an old 233 Mhz Laptop with 64 megabytes of memory 
running under Windows 98 SE. The recommended system for use is a computer 
with a 266 Mhz processing speed with Windows 95 or greater.
  .
next slide
2
Using Digipan
  Digipan can also operate under the Linux operating system. This has been verified 
using Ubuntu Linux version 8.04 using the Wine Emulator version 1.0. (Transmit and 
Waterfall settings must be set using the native sound controls as they do not 
function inside of Digipan when used under Linux.)
 
  PSK can be used on HF, VHF, and UHF frequencies, modulated with AM, FM, or 
SSB, and it is implemented with very little hardware other than a radio, a method to 
connect the radio to a computer, and the software to send and receive with.
   A more  in depth discussion on this will follow later under the topic of Hardware 
Considerations.
next slide
3
PSK Signals
A Short explanation of PSK
  Phase­shift keying (PSK) is a digital modulation scheme that conveys data by 
changing, or modulating, the phase of a reference signal (the carrier wave). There 
are three major classes of digital modulation techniques used for transmission of 
digitally represented data:
   * Amplitude­shift keying (ASK) ­ on off keying such as that used to send Morse 
code.
   * Frequency­shift keying (FSK) ­ varies frequency to represent ones and zeros. An 
example would be its use in a telephone modem.
   * Phase­shift keying (PSK) – varies the carrier wave signal to represent ones and 
zeros. There are several versions of PSK and a portion of those will be discussed 
shortly.
 ( A benefit to using PSK is the ability for a signal to be sent at lower power levels 
than phone (voice) to go the same distance and it is much less susceptible to 
interference from close stations. Multiple conversations or text data can be sent on 
very close frequencies at the same time without loss of information. ) 
next slide
4
PSK Signals
  All shift keyed signals convey data by changing some part of a base signal in 
response to a data signal. In the case of PSK, the phase of the carrier wave is 
changed to represent the data signal. There are two basic ways of using the phase 
of a signal:
    * By viewing the phase itself as carrying the information, in which case the 
demodulator must have a reference, or clock signal to compare the received signal's 
phase against; or
    * By viewing the change in the phase as carrying information — differential 
schemes, some of which do not need a reference carrier (to a certain extent).
  Digipan can use three variants of PSK which are well adapted to amateur radio 
use.
  Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) is a modulation technique that has proven to be 
very effective for use on the amateur radio bands.
  One form of this, known as PSK31, uses a small bandwidth of 31 Hertz to convey 
information. The coding, called Varicode, is similar to ASCII used in radio teletype 
(RTTY) excepting that loss of data synchronization is much less likely to occur with 
BPSK.
next slide
 
5
PSK Signals
 Another form of BPSK is PSK63 which uses an increased bandwidth of 63 Hertz 
to increase the speed of data sent.  The third type is Quadrature phase­shift keying 
(QPSK). Sometimes this is known as quaternary PSK, quadriphase PSK, 4­PSK, or 
4­QAM. QPSK uses four phases which are used to  encode two bits per symbol, 
doubling the speed of data sent using the same band width as PSK31. This also 
reduces the bit error rate (BER) — sometimes mis­perceived as twice the bit error 
rate of BPSK.
A BPSK signal as shown on a 
constellation diagram.
A QPSK signal as shown on a 
constellation diagram.
  As you can see QPSK can send more information in the same amount of time, 
over the use of BPSK, although it does not seem to be used in preference over 
BPSK. 
next slide
6
PSK Signals
 PSK31, PSK63, and QPSK are all available for you to use, with the Digipan 
software.
  As of the year 2010, PSK31 seems to be the preferred method of sending text data 
digitally.
  It does not matter which mode you choose for sending data as long as there is 
someone on the other end to receive it. There are enough subtle differences audibly